Rogue Star HIP 85605 on Collision Course with our Solar System, but What about "Earth"???

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It’s recognized as HIP 85605, one of two stars that make up a binary in the Hercules constellation approximately 16 light years away. And if a latest research paper written by Dr. Coryn Bailer-Jones of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany is accurate, it is on a crash course with our Solar System.

Now for the good news: according to Bailer-Jones’ calculations, the star will pass by our Solar System at a distance of 0.04 parsecs, which is equal to 8,000 times the distance among the Earth and the Sun (8,000 AUs). In addition, this pass by will not affect Earth or any other planet’s orbit about the Sun. And may be most prominently of all, none of it will be occurring for another 240,000 to 470,000 years from now.


“Even though the galaxy comprises very many stars,” Bailor-Jones told Universe Today via email, “the spaces among them are enormous. So even over the (long) life of our galaxy so far, the possibility of any two stars has in fact collided — as opposite to just coming close — is very small.”

However, in cosmological terms, that still counts as a near-miss. In a cosmos that is 46 billion light years in any direction – and that’s just the visible part of it – an event that is predictable to take place just 50 light days away is reflected to be pretty close. And in the background of space and time, a quarter of a million to half a million years is the very close call.


The real worry is the effect that the interaction of HIP 85605 could have on the “Oort Cloud” – the enormous cloud of icy planetesimals that surrounds the Solar System. Since its distance is somewhat 20,000 and 50,000 AU from our Sun, HIP 85605 would truly move from the “Oort cloud” and cause severe disturbance.

A large number of these planetesimals could be driven off into space, some of them could be sent racing towards Earth. Assuming humanity is still there at this point in time, this could present a bit of a trouble, even if it is blow-out over the passage of a million years.


This post was written by Usman Abrar. To contact the writer write to iamusamn93@gmail.com. Follow on Facebook

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